I like nature, cats, board games and coffee among other things. Trudging through law school. Happiest at the movies.

Paris is looking forward to being home to the largest rooftop farm in the world. It is estimated that the farm will produce about 2000 pounds of produce in a day during peak season. Let us have a look at how this trend is being picked up all over the world.

Urban farming company Agripolis is bringing what will be the world’s largest rooftop urban farm to Paris to get city dwellers closer to nature and sustainably produce a wide assortment of fruits and vegetables that they can include in their diet. This 1,50,000-square-foot sprawling green space will be atop the Exhibition Centre at Porte De Versailles when it will open up in 2020. The urban farm is a significant part of the decade-long renovation project to make the exhibition center a model for sustainable development as the rest of Paris’ infrastructure follows suit. The produce will be grown entirely organically in an aeroponic manner, meaning they’ll be arranged vertically above ground in crop columns and fed by a rain of water and biological nutrients. Agripolis hopes that the farm will establish itself as a model for the rest of the world. “By installing working farms on the sites we operate, we are helping to foster environmental and economic resilience,” says Agripolis founder Pascal Harder, noting this is the organization’s core principle.

In New York City, urban farming is changing the way communities approach food production, sustainability, and socialization. Farming in a concrete jungle seems like a utopian idea prima facie, yet transforming one of the world’s largest cities into a sustainable metropolis is exactly what urbanites are aiming for one farm at a time. Urban farming is an agricultural revolution aiding the change of global urban landscapes, even in Brooklyn. From rooftop-grown organic herbs to brownstone backyard tomato plants, urban farming is creating green utopias in otherwise unused or abandoned metropolitan spaces.

This phenomenon is not just restricted to fruits and vegetables. The Brooklyn Grange Apiary, which is an extension of its flagship farm in Long Island City, specializes in producing natural, distinctly flavored honey that will meet the city’s local demand. To produce the honey, the apiary will open 30 beehives in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Hives will be installed to help pollinate crops and increase productivity.

Rooftops in densely populated Hong Kong are fast turning ­greener and more fertile as urban farmers seek to grow crops from their homes and offices and create a more liveable community. Some 60 rooftop farms and 1,400 farmers have emerged locally over the past decade, and a handful of farms are added each year, according to Mathew Pryor, an associate professor and head of the landscape architecture ­division at the University of Hong Kong. Some 60 rooftop farms and 1,400 farmers have emerged locally over the past decade, and a handful of farms are added each year, according to Mathew Pryor, an associate professor and head of the landscape architecture ­division at the University of Hong Kong.

Urban farming can reduce food-related carbon emissions, including transportation (low food mileage) and production costs (packaging and storage). It can bolster economic growth by keeping the exchange of food localized and gentrifying depressed urban areas and improve green and energy-efficient initiatives by “reducing harmful runoff, increasing shading and countering the unpleasant heat-island effect,” according to National Geographic. The pace at which urban farming is expanding, it may soon set out to be a regular social activity.

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